Art LovesHer: [visual artist/writer]: Linda Kleinbub

10997626_787821647959740_6475645725974492718_nNative New Yorker, Linda Kleinbub, is a published author in her own right. After an introduction at The Delancey through mutual friends, I came to discover that like most New Yorkers, Linda has been keeping a secret. On top of being a superb writer, she is also  visual artist! After premiering some of her art at February’s Art Salon, we caught up with this multi-talented woman to talk art & life. Check it out below.

  1. When did you first begin doing what you do?  I have always had a creative streak in me.  One of my earliest artistic achievements was when I won a tea set for a coloring contest in kindergarten.  In grammar school when I was given a creative writing assignment I would often write very elaborate stories, sometimes staying up late into the night to finish them.  I started keeping a journal when I was 12, it started as a diary but as I got older it turned into poetry.
  2. When did you become serious about it, and pursue it as a life path? Would you consider what you do your life path?  I feel that my life has many paths.  When I was an undergrad, studying computer science, I took poetry and art classes for fun, photography, sculpture, sketching, ceramics, watercolor and oil painting.  While I have always been interested in art and writing, I have always wanted to be a mother.  I had my two sons when I was quite young and there were times when I had to put my desires on hold to raise them.  Since they have grown and became independent I have time to pursue my writing and art with more passion.
  3. Where does your name come from? I don’t use a stage name, but I started to sign my paintings LWK which stands for my legal name, Linda Welk Kleinbub, but when I publish my writing I just use Linda Kleinbub, for its simplicity. DSC04144
  4. Why do you create? Creating is an emotional outlet for me.  Something I do to keep me sane.  Some of my favorite pieces come out of very emotional experiences.
  5.  What inspires you? Nature, especially trees, the colors of the changing seasons, the ocean, human interaction, riding the subway, the rhythm of city life, music, photographs and artwork on Instagram
  6. Who are some of your major influences? My father is one of my biggest influences, he was a painter and a musician.  When I was young I would watch him as he created.  He would explain color mixing, and different painting techniques.  Other influences/role models include Louise Glück, T. S. Eliot, A.R. Ammons, Jim Carroll, Star Black, Keith Haring, Peter Max, and Vincent Van Gogh.
  7. What’s one of the most rewarding parts of your work? What is one of the hardest?  When the work comes easy, the words flow or my vision emerges in a painting.  When I read at open mics, or show my work, and strangers react positively to it.  The hardest would be self-criticism; I can get hard on myself, start asking myself too many questions, let doubt ruin the organic process.
  8. How do you get through blocks in your creativity? Painting and photography come fairly easy to me.  When I get writer’s block sometimes I read, or I write centos.  A cento is a poetic form in which poems are created by combining lines for a variety of text.  Writing centos is enjoyable, sometimes I feel like it’s cheating, but I love to combine the lines of many different poems and create something new and meaningful to me.
  9. What advice would you give a nineteen year old creative who wants to make their thing into their whole life? You have nothing to lose, so go for it. Nothing will happen if you don’t try!
  10. What is feminism to you? Supporting and encouraging woman to be the best and strongest that they can be.  Encouraging women to be fearless, to believe in themselves, that they can accomplish anything if they work hard and never give up.
  11. What do you have coming up in the next couple months? Besides focusing on my work, I am the co-founder of Pen Pal Poets.  We organize poetry readings and open mics, I have requested to be a part of this summer’s Poetry Festival on Governor’s Island. We are planning a reading/ open mic for the spring.

Art LovesHer: [visual artist/writer]: Linda Kleinbub

10997626_787821647959740_6475645725974492718_nNative New Yorker, Linda Kleinbub, is a published author in her own right. After an introduction at The Delancey through mutual friends, I came to discover that like most New Yorkers, Linda has been keeping a secret. On top of being a superb writer, she is also  visual artist! After premiering some of her art at February’s Art Salon, we caught up with this multi-talented woman to talk art & life. Check it out below.

  1. When did you first begin doing what you do?  I have always had a creative streak in me.  One of my earliest artistic achievements was when I won a tea set for a coloring contest in kindergarten.  In grammar school when I was given a creative writing assignment I would often write very elaborate stories, sometimes staying up late into the night to finish them.  I started keeping a journal when I was 12, it started as a diary but as I got older it turned into poetry.
  2. When did you become serious about it, and pursue it as a life path? Would you consider what you do your life path?  I feel that my life has many paths.  When I was an undergrad, studying computer science, I took poetry and art classes for fun, photography, sculpture, sketching, ceramics, watercolor and oil painting.  While I have always been interested in art and writing, I have always wanted to be a mother.  I had my two sons when I was quite young and there were times when I had to put my desires on hold to raise them.  Since they have grown and became independent I have time to pursue my writing and art with more passion.
  3. Where does your name come from? I don’t use a stage name, but I started to sign my paintings LWK which stands for my legal name, Linda Welk Kleinbub, but when I publish my writing I just use Linda Kleinbub, for its simplicity. DSC04144
  4. Why do you create? Creating is an emotional outlet for me.  Something I do to keep me sane.  Some of my favorite pieces come out of very emotional experiences.
  5.  What inspires you? Nature, especially trees, the colors of the changing seasons, the ocean, human interaction, riding the subway, the rhythm of city life, music, photographs and artwork on Instagram
  6. Who are some of your major influences? My father is one of my biggest influences, he was a painter and a musician.  When I was young I would watch him as he created.  He would explain color mixing, and different painting techniques.  Other influences/role models include Louise Glück, T. S. Eliot, A.R. Ammons, Jim Carroll, Star Black, Keith Haring, Peter Max, and Vincent Van Gogh.
  7. What’s one of the most rewarding parts of your work? What is one of the hardest?  When the work comes easy, the words flow or my vision emerges in a painting.  When I read at open mics, or show my work, and strangers react positively to it.  The hardest would be self-criticism; I can get hard on myself, start asking myself too many questions, let doubt ruin the organic process.
  8. How do you get through blocks in your creativity? Painting and photography come fairly easy to me.  When I get writer’s block sometimes I read, or I write centos.  A cento is a poetic form in which poems are created by combining lines for a variety of text.  Writing centos is enjoyable, sometimes I feel like it’s cheating, but I love to combine the lines of many different poems and create something new and meaningful to me.
  9. What advice would you give a nineteen year old creative who wants to make their thing into their whole life? You have nothing to lose, so go for it. Nothing will happen if you don’t try!
  10. What is feminism to you? Supporting and encouraging woman to be the best and strongest that they can be.  Encouraging women to be fearless, to believe in themselves, that they can accomplish anything if they work hard and never give up.
  11. What do you have coming up in the next couple months? Besides focusing on my work, I am the co-founder of Pen Pal Poets.  We organize poetry readings and open mics, I have requested to be a part of this summer’s Poetry Festival on Governor’s Island. We are planning a reading/ open mic for the spring.

Art LovesHer: [painter/designer] Jaszmine Hawkins

DSCF9899Born and raised in New Jersey, but very familiar with the NYC life, Jaszmine Hawkins is interdisciplinary visual artist and founder of Villianous Visuals. Since featuring with Art LovHer in September 2013, this phenomenal female has been impacting the art world with her work. We caught up with the triple threat (Jaszmine balances being artist, model &entrepreneur)  as she prepares for next month’s Pancakes & Booze Art show coming to  M1-5 Bar in Soho April 16th; to talk art & life.

  1. When did you first begin doing what you do?Art always played a major role in my childhood, but I remember feeling like I was onto something during a project for my Senior art class. I had painted a random Abercrombie & Fitch Model, I remember looking at my usage of colors, styles, techniques and thought this was something I should look into further.
  2. When did you become serious about it, and pursue it as a life path? Would you consider what you do your life path?. Sophomore year in college was when I started realizing that Art was the only thing that makes sense to me. Based mainly on the fact that this can create chaos and diminish it as well. I found that fascinating and I knew that if anything could draw such intense emotions out of me, that is something I should be choosing as my life path, it is what I was planted here for.
  3. Why do you create? I create because like most humans I have a God complex, but instead of me trying to persuade people of whats right and wrong I decided to use my complex and creativity to expand my mind and give some food for other peoples imagination. I am a creator and destroyer naturally I just like that I can channel that through art.
  4. Who are some of your major influences/role models? Some of my major influences come from Frida Kahlo, Ron Mueck, Edgar Degas, Kara Walker, Takashi Murakami, Dali, Chuck Connelly, Basquiat,Anne Rice, and my Late Aunt.
  5. What inspires you? My inspirations comes from every part of my journey in this life. For example, I can get inspired at the way a ornate looking light fixture looks on a retro wall paper in a motel and or I can paint from intense emotion. Life is my ultimate muse.
  6. What advice would you give a nineteen year old creative who wants to make their thing into their whole life?  I would tell a young creative not to be upset if there is ever a time that you doubt your potential in this career path. If you find yourself creating not for only the sole purpose of trying to attain a financially stable life, when you create because you have to, because that how you express everything.10408727_800491153377618_2597133757467539613_n
  7. What’s one of the most rewarding parts of your work?  There are many things that are rewarding about this passion. The manifestation of a thought is outstanding. The ability to allow people to see your thoughts/visions is a God like power, but more importantly being able to inspire others to pursue their dreams.
  8. What’s one of the hardest? The most challenging thing about being a working artist, is that, you are mainly working a 9 to 5 for someone else in order to stay afloat as a young adult. A situation has not presented itself yet where I can gain the stability that I need to make art full time. I am working on being self sufficient very soon.
  9. How do you get through blocks in your creativity? I get through creative blocks by taking a hiatus on what I am working on at the time, work on another project, or do something drastically different like furniture building.
  10. How did you become affiliated with Art LovHer? A friend told me about this event and sent me the article about the Art LovHer at The Living Gallery. I inquired about a spot with Joi Sanchez and that was that.  That event had to be the livest show I had ever been a part of. I mean the people that came out to support had crazy artistic/ musical talent.
  11. If you use a stage/pen name, Where does your name come from? Villainous Visuals aka VV was something that came to me when I was looking at a series of my work and I was trying to come up with a site name. I consider my work to be wicked and I felt like my “stage name” needed to reflect that.
  12. What have you got coming up in the next couple of months? In April I am participating in another Pancakes and Booze show in NYC, I loved the first one, the crowd was eclectic and unbelievably talented. The, in May I have another group show in Philadelphia at a bar called the “Tattooed Mom”. Looking forward to getting more into the Philly scene.

 

street poets nyc

“Once in a while, something or someone will break through. It happened to me early in the week. In my case, it wasn’t immediate. It took a few seconds of hearing some loud voices for my mind to say, “hey wait, they are saying something worth listening to!””

Our thoughts excactly! #shoutouttoyourlife Check out this artocle on the latest spotting of #streetpoetsnyc

Art LovesHer: [writer] MJ Murphy

464266_3640992788259_143876591_oBack in April of 2014, MJ Murphy blessed the Art LovHer open mic with her powerful poetics. Since then, this phenomenal woman has continued to hone her craft, most recently beginning work on her MFA at Columbia University. We spoke with this inspired and motivated young talent on life & process.

ArtLovesHer: When did you begin your craft/art?

MJ Murphy: I began writing poetry when I was young, maybe in middle school? It has always been a way for me to express my feelings when I felt like nobody was around to listen.

ALH: What inspires you?
MJM: I am inspired by a lot of things. Anything can really be a source of inspiration.

ALH: Who would you say are some of your major influences?
MJM: My major influences are definitely my family, my heritage, my backgrounds, and my experiences.

ALH: What does being an artist mean to you?
MJM: Being an artist means that I have the freedom to speak my thoughts in a way that allows others to relate.

ALH: How do you get through creative blocks?
MJM: I don’t try to force it. If I have a topic to write about, I write about it. If not, I don’t. However, those periods don’t usually last long.

ALH: What advice would you give to a younger relative considering a future in the creative arts?
MJM: Pursue your happiness.

ALH: How did you become affiliated with ArtLovHer?
MJM: I was introduced through Joi Sanchez through a performance I did with Apt78 with Word at 4F.

ALH: What does Victory mean to you?
MJM: Victory is creating a goal for yourself and attaining it. Attainment, not in the possessive sense, but in a way that you free yourself from the disappointment of underachieving your full potential.

#ArtSeeksHer: Fire Island Artist Residency

Fire Island Artist Residency (FIAR), the first residency in the United States exclusively for artists identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer, is now accepting applications for its prestigious and internationally recognized summer program. Now in its fourth season in the secluded community of Cherry Grove, NY, an historic LGBTQ settlement of Fire Island, five emerging artists will share a live/work space for a four-week program marked by intimate studio visits with, and public lectures by, renowned leaders in contemporary art and curation.

Fees
$35 Application Fee
FIAR provides lodging, studio space, and a stipend for all meals.

Eligibility
LGBTQ emerging visual artists demonstrating new perspectives in contemporary visual art are encouraged to apply. Non-US citizens with fluency in English are also encouraged to apply.

2015 Program Dates
July 24, 2015 – August 21, 2015

 

APPLY HERE

#ArtSeeksHer: BRIC Visual Artist Residency [Summer Residency]

BRIC Visual Artist Residency TIMELINE:
Application period: FEBRUARY 5-27, 2015
Notification to artists: MARCH 24, 2015
Residency: JUNE 22 – AUGUST 14, 2015 (8 weeks)

This summer, BRIC will hold its second annual Visual Artist Residency program. Similar to last year, two residents will have space in the Artists Studio at BRIC House. In addition, BRIC is pleased to announce that we are partnering with Saint Anne’s School to provide additional studio space for one resident at 33 Clinton Street in Brooklyn Heights, the former space of BRIC Rotunda Gallery!

  • ARTIST STUDIO AT BRIC HOUSE:  This is a flexible space on the ground floor that is used for creating, rehearsing, exhibiting, and performing across multiple disciplines. This 1,400 square-foot room measures 27’ x 52’ and has a 12-foot ceiling height.  It will be partitioned for use by two artists during the residency.  Artists in residence will have access to their studios daily from 8am to midnight.
  • 33 CLINTON STREET: The residency at 33 Clinton Street is aimed at artists who are able to work independently and can responsibly take care of this space.  The artist working at this space will be responsible for opening up and disarming the alarm in this facility daily, along with locking up and  setting the alarm each night, as they come and go. The artist’s hours may therefore be flexible. Proposals for this location should explain the need for a space of this size (approx 700-sq-feet).  Priority will be given to artists whose proposals will have a low impact on the space.  In explaining your work plan, also make note of steps to be taken to care for the space.

Space will be provided to selected residents free of charge; no honoraria or artists fees are offered.  The residency is open to both New York area artists as well as those from other parts of the United States who wish to spend time and work in the city. Please be advised that we are unable to fund travel or living expenses.  Applicants must be U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents.

Artists who are accepted into the program must commit to using their studio a significant amount of time each week.

During the residency, artists will be expected to engage with the public through open studio events, an informal illustrated talk on BRIC’s stoop, or through other forms of audience engagement.

BRIC will provide exposure for your work through multiple means, including studio visits with BRIC’s curatorial staff and profiles to be published on BRIC’s website or Blog.

This residency is available to professional, practicing artists and MFA students.

Selection criteria:

This residency is open to emerging artists who demonstrate much promise, and to mid-career artists with a documented record of exhibitions and other accomplishments.  We seek artists who will be able to work independently and productively during the eight-week period (June 22 – August 14, 2015) and who have a solid plan of work for their residency period.

Because BRIC House is a public space with many visitors and activities each week, we will select artists in residence whose work involves little or no noise, no fumes or toxic materials, and who require only moderate access to water (there is a public bathroom near the Artist Studio and a utility sink in the loading dock area, but no sink in the studio spaces).

A panel consisting of BRIC’s curatorial staff, Gallery Manager, and past Residency artists will select this summer’s Residents.

To Apply:
The application process for the 2015 BRIC Visual Artist Residency is now OPEN. The deadline to apply is February 27, 2015. 

#ArtSeeksHer: DELVE workshop series @Trestle Gallery [workshops/classes]

DELVE workshop series

cost: 250.00

dates: 1/29, 2/26, 3/5, 4/2, 5/7
Each class runs from 6:30-9:30pm

The key to fulfilling your professional goals is to be able to effectively, clearly and beautifully communicate who you are as an artist and what you do, in person, in writing and online. Since our art work is often seen on a screen and not in person, let’s make sure we have the best possible tools to give an amazing first impression. In this five series workshop we will explore:

1/29/15: Goal Setting & Achieving (What are your professional goals, what do you have to do to achieve them and do you have a plan to make them happen?)

2/26/15: Writing About Your Work (Yes your art work speaks for itself but the writing that accompanies it is essential.)

3/5/15: Crafting compelling promotional materials (Beautiful design is a must when telling people about what you do.)

4/2/14: Showcasing Your Work (Is your work photographed and displayed in the best possible way online in order to give your viewer the best possible insight into your work and how you make it?)

5/7/14: Creative Marketing (How do you tell the world about what you do? Let’s make sure what you send out is clear, engaging and authentic.)

Each DELVE workshop will build on the one before, and they are open to artists at any stage of their careers, whether you are just starting out or need to refresh the way you communicate your work. The end result will be a renewed sense of how you talk about yourself as an artist, your work, and how you communicate your art work to the world online. We encourage each artist to bring images of their work, something to take notes with and be willing to share– all DELVE workshops encourage an open environment of exchange.

*On 2/26/15 please feel free to bring a camera you use to photograph your work and a piece you’d like to document, if possible. Each session will offer assignments and tips to make the most progress on your  online presence in between workshop meetings.

Click for more info.

#ArtSeeksHer- 100 GATES seeks Muralist [Artist Call]

100 GATES is a Lower East Side public art initiative that connects artists with LES business owners by installing murals on the roll down security gates belonging to businesses in the neighborhood. We’re recruiting artists and businesses during the winter, with installations timed to take place throughout the warmer summer months. You can learn more about the project and see examples of current installations here: www.100gates.nyc
Application Instructions
Please fill out the form with your contact information and an explanation on how you ideally envision your gate.

http://www.100gates.nyc/get-involved-artist/

Prospective artists will be contacted in the coming weeks and a phone interview will be set up to discuss project details.

view on NYFA.org